Tag Archives: warm season crops

10th Annual Seed Swap

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~ A Free Community Event for 10 Years! ~

Event Details

  • 11:30am-12:00pm ‘Home Grown Seed Share‘ -open early for people with home grown seed to share AND all people affected by the Camp Fire
  • 12:00pm-3:00pm Seed Swap Potluck Style
  • Plant & Scion Swap
  • **‘Garden Space Connections’ -Help connect gardeners in need of space in 2019 with gardeners who have space to offer
  • Seeds & Plants For Sale
  • Community Non-Profits
  • Food & Beverages For Sale (courtesy of Chico Natural Foods!)

**New this year, ‘Garden Space Connections’! In light of the Camp Fire we want to help connect people who cannot utilize their own gardens this coming season with those who have garden space to share!

 

What To Bring

  • Surplus Seeds, Bulbs, Plants, Cuttings & Scion to Exchange
  • Used Envelopes/Containers & Pens/Pencils (please label your items)
  • YOU DO NOT NEED TO BRING SEED TO ATTEND!

 

To Volunteer

We need volunteers to help us make the 10th year of the seed swap a huge success, please consider volunteering for a shift or two. It’s simple and easy to do online: https://www.volunteersignup.org/YLCRA

For More Information

Hosted By

Sponsored By

WOULD YOU LIKE TO SPONSOR THE SEED SWAP? Contact us at info@chicoseedlendinglibrary.org

 

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~ Donations Help Keep The Seed Swap Going ~


The Annual Seed Swap and the Chico Seed Lending Library (CSLL) are programs that are fiscally sponsored by Earthshed Solutions, a 501(c)(3) public charity. If you wish to make a tax-deductible donation to help keep the Seed Swap going strong please follow the link to make an online donation or contact us at info@chicoseedlendinglibrary.org.

 

New Tomato Varieties

CSLL April LGT

Our warm season seed inventory grew at our last ‘Lettuce Get Together’ thanks to volunteers! We have many new varieties of TOMATOES and new flowers and herbs as well.

TOMATO VARIETIES

  • Tigerella
  • Pink Ponderosa
  • Pink Caspian
  • Jubilee
  • Beefsteak
  • Stupice
  • Black Krim
  • Brandywine OTV
  • Chadwick’s Cherry
  • Marvel Stripe

We have both determinant and indeterminate varieties to choose from; each packet tells you which is which. What does that mean?

There are two main growth habits for tomatoes (from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange):

Determinate varieties grow to a certain height (usually 2-3ft) then stop growing and mature all of the fruit in a short period of time.  Many paste tomatoes are determinate. These varieties are great for canning and well suited to growing in short or split season areas

Indeterminate tomatoes keep growing, flowering and setting fruit until stopped by frost, disease, or really bad weather. Most Cherry and large beefsteak tomatoes are indeterminate, They need to be caged or staked with a really sturdy support.  Most really large heirloom tomatoes are indeterminate. These varieties are great if you have plenty of space, warm summer temperatures, and a long enough growing season.

What herb goes fantastic with tomato? BASIL! And we have several varieties to choose from.

BASIL VARIETIES

  • Dark Opal Purple
  • Genovese
  • Italian Pesto
  • Mammoth
  • Profuma di Genova
  • Queenette Thai basil

Now all you’ll need is a good sourdough baguette and some quality olive oil and you’re in for a real treat!


Check out the latest seed inventory pages for the full breakdown of what Chico Seed Lending Library has for you to borrow, grow out, harvest and return!

COOL SEASON VEGETABLE SEED

WARM SEASON VEGETABLE SEED

FLOWERS/HERBS AND OTHER SEED

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Seed Starting Tips -Spring

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If you attended the 9th Annual Seed Swap you now have loads of seeds for your gardens. In this post we’ll give you some basic vegetable and herb seed starting tips to help you on your way to a bountiful garden.

This is last opportunity to plant some cool season crops! Many cool season crops are planted in late summer or early fall for harvest over winter and spring. However there are some vegetables that can be planted in early spring if they are fast maturing. Cool season crops are those that grow best and produce the best quality when the average temperatures are 55°F to 75°F and are usually tolerant of slight frosts.

Warm temperatures will force some crops to “bolt” which means it will go into flower mode rather than leaf/stem growing mode. And for things like Broccoli where we eat the immature flowers this is not good if the flowers mature faster than we can harvest and enjoy them!

Look for information on the seed packet or online to see how long each variety takes to reach maturity and plant those that will be ready for harvest within 60 days or less and/or are slow bolting varieties. We’ve marked crops with an * to note which you should ensure are fast maturing.

Some Summer crops can be started indoors now or in a sheltered area with heat applied to prevent the seed from rotting. Summer crops require heat and while crops in the Tomato family can take 1-2 months until transplanting size squashes, melons and beans only take a couple of weeks so shouldn’t be started indoors until mid to late March. Many herbs can also be directly sowed in the garden for harvest and enjoyment later in the season.

Seed to start indoors or in a warm sheltered area:

  • Artichoke
  • *Broccoli
  • *Cabbage
  • *Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • *Collards
  • Eggplant
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leek
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes

Seed to direct sow/plant outdoors (all but root crops can be started indoors if desired):

  • Asian Greens (bok choy etc.)
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Chard
  • Chives
  • Fenugreek
  • Lettuce
  • Mache
  • Mustard
  • Peas
  • Radish
  • Spinach
  • Turnip
  • Borage
  • Calendula
  • Cilantro
  • Clover
  • Dill
  • Lemon Balm
  • Parsley

NOTE:  These are recommendations pooled from successful farmers and gardeners according to our “typical” seasons. Use this information as a good starting place but don’t interpret it as absolutely perfect for every location. Some years may vary and some yards have unique microclimates so don’t be afraid to experiment and find what works best for you and your gardens.

Many thanks to Sherri Scott, CSLL seed librarian and Grub Grown Nursery owner, for her wisdom in compiling these seed starting resources.

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